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Frequently Asked Questions



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Frequently Asked Questions about Joy-Fuller Rehabilitation Center

Why do all these professionals need to work with me?

Each professional brings to the rehab team his or her own areas of expertise. Each professional then stays current on that area of health care. When the team works together on an interdisciplinary team such as on Joy-Fuller Rehabilitation Center, they help to treat the whole person, and the return of function is greater than if the treatment is of a lesser intensity.

What is an inpatient rehabilitation facility, and why is it different from some of the skilled nursing facilities in nursing homes?

An inpatient rehabilitation facility like Joy-Fuller Rehabilitation Center can provide intensive, interdisciplinary treatment that can be obtained nowhere else. It is composed of nurses who specialize in patients recovering from strokes, brain injuries, and orthopedic injuries, and cardiac conditions. The therapists work together with the patient and the family, to solve problems and return patients to the community. Our focus is on education and training the patient and the family to do more for him or herself. Therefore, after very intense therapy, the patient is more likely to go home. In other facilities you won’t find a team approach, as much education, or get as much therapy.

Our patients receive 3 hours of care every day by an interdisciplinary team. In a nursing home, patients receive therapy in 15 – 30 minute sessions Monday through Friday. The Joy-Fuller inpatient center has specially trained RNs specializing in helping patients regain their independence including bowel and bladder functions.

How often will my doctor see the patient while he or she is on Joy-Fuller Rehabilitation Center?

Your doctor will see you within the first 24 hours and at least every three days, unless your condition needs more. At skilled nursing facilities, your physician is only required to see you once every thirty days.

Can we visit the patient while he or she is a patient on the Joy-Fuller Rehabilitation Center?

Besides the patient, the family is the most important part of the team. Unless there needs to be a period of time in therapies for the patient to adjust the intensity of the treatment, the family will be encouraged to participate fully in the treatment team, including education, and helping the patient learn new skills.

How do I know that Joy-Fuller Rehabilitation Center is a quality program?

Over the course of a number of years, we have returned at least 80% of our patients home, which has exceeded regional and national outcomes. We have always earned three year accreditations by CARF (Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities), since our first survey in 1992. We are currently recognized for specialty programs in stroke and brain injury. We are also part of the continuum of care as a Stroke Center of Excellence, and we are part of a Magnet Hospital. While these may seem like just more trophies getting dusty on a shelf, they are actually standards of excellence in healthcare, and they show that we are committed to providing our patients with the best care, based on evidence in the field, and with the lowest chance of hospital readmission.

Does the team have experience and expertise in treating my illness or injury?

We are a specialty facility, and as such, there many conditions we don’t treat. The ones we do specialize in are listed below, with the number of patients we treated in 2012. Our treatment team specializes in rehabilitation, and is accredited by CARF (The Rehabilitation Accreditation Commission) for our programs. This tells you that we are committed to care for our patients with these problems.

Frequently Asked Questions about Acute Therapy Services

Why do all these professionals need to work with me?

Each professional brings to the rehab team his or her own areas of expertise. Each professional then stays current on that area of health care. When the team works together on an interdisciplinary team such as on our team of Acute Therapists, they help to treat the whole person, and the return of function is greater than if the treatment is of a lesser intensity.

What if I am tired or feel sick. Does the therapist have to get me out of bed?

While you are in the hospital in acute care, there may be times of the day you feel better or worse, and day to day, your ability to participate may fluctuate. That’s normal. If you experience any pain or discomfort during the treatments, you should tell your therapist. Your therapist can alter your treatment based on your tolerance, so you should keep him or her informed about how you are feeling. The therapist can also work with nursing to adjust your medication so that the therapy session is at a time that your pain medications are working well. While everyone has the right to decline from participating in therapy, your physician has recommended it to help with your recovery and prevent complications after your illness or injury. Your therapist is educated to be your advocate, so he or she can help you achieve your goals at a rate that is comfortable for you.

How often will I see my therapist?

After the physician orders the evaluation by the physical therapist, occupational therapist, and/or speech-language pathologist, the therapist recommends how often you will be seen. Generally, in acute care, depending on your illness or injury and your recovery, you may be seen a few times a week for some of the medical diagnoses, or as often as twice a day after orthopedic surgery. There may be times that the therapist arrives to see you and you are unable to be treated, if you have another test or are otherwise indisposed. If the therapist is able, he or she may try again later after the other patients have been seen. Patients who cannot be seen one day are the priority for the next day. If there are many patients to be seen, the nursing staff may help to assist with getting patients out of bed that day.

 


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