BEACON EMR HIPAA Disclaimer Site Map Social Media
BayCare Health System
Community Benefit Financial Assistance Policy Quality Report Card Health Library News Doctor Connect Find Us
Services Hospitals Find A Doctor Classes & Events About Us Careers Contact Us Get E-Newsletter
HealthDay Articles & Information
 Back  Back


May We Help You?
 

Call 1-877-692-2922
Monday-Friday, 8am to 5pm

Persons with hearing and speech disabilities can reach the above number through TDD and other specialized equipment by calling the Florida Relay Service at 711.

Contact Us
Send 
e-mail
Search jobs


Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+) Font Size
Print    Email
Search Health Information   

Early Discipline Tied to Less Use of Drugs, Alcohol in Teens

A program to help correct disruptive behavior at ages 7 to 9 seemed to make a difference through age 17

THURSDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Correcting disruptive behavior in young children could help prevent them from using alcohol and drugs when they're teens, researchers report.

Their study included 172 boys with disruptive behavior in kindergarten who were divided into three groups. All of the boys came from low-income families in Montreal.

One group of 46 boys took part in a two-year intervention program when they were ages 7 to 9. The program included training to help the boys learn self-control and reduce impulsive and antisocial behavior. Their parents were taught to recognize problem behaviors in their sons, set clear goals and reinforce appropriate behaviors.

A second group of 84 boys were assigned to an intensive observation group. They attended a half-day laboratory testing session, were observed at school, and their families were visited in their homes by researchers. A third group of 42 boys received no intervention and acted as the control group.

All of the boys in the study were followed until age 17 in order to assess their use of alcohol and drugs. The boys in the two-year program had lower levels of drug and alcohol use from their early teens until they completed high school than the boys in the other two groups, according to the study in the Aug. 8 online edition of the British Journal of Psychiatry.

"Our study shows that a two-year intervention aimed at key risk factors in disruptive kindergarten boys from low socioeconomic environments can effectively reduce substance use behaviors in adolescence -- not only in early adolescence but up to the end of high school, eight years post-intervention," study author Natalie Castellanos-Ryan, of the University of Montreal, said in a university news release.

"This finding is noteworthy because the effects are stronger and longer-lasting than for most substance use interventions that have been studied before," she added.

The findings suggest "that by selectively targeting disruptive behaviors in early childhood, and without addressing substance use directly, we could have long-term effects on substance use behaviors in later life," Castellanos-Ryan said.

"More research is now needed to examine how these effects can generalize to girls and other populations, and to explore aspects related to the cost/benefit of this type of intervention," she added.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics explains how to change your child's behavior.


SOURCE: University of Montreal, news release, Aug. 7, 2013

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Serving The Tampa Bay Area © Copyright 2014 BayCare Health System