BEACON EMR HIPAA Disclaimer Site Map Social Media
BayCare Health System
Community Benefit Financial Assistance Policy Quality Report Card Health Library News Dr.BayCare Find Us
Services Hospitals Find A Doctor Classes & Events About Us Careers Contact Us Get E-Newsletter
HealthDay Articles & Information
 Back  Back


May We Help You?
 

Call 1-877-692-2922
Monday-Friday, 8am to 5pm

Persons with hearing and speech disabilities can reach the above number through TDD and other specialized equipment by calling the Florida Relay Service at 711.

Contact Us
Send 
e-mail
Search jobs


Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+) Font Size
Print    Email
Search Health Information   

Study: No Long-Term Heart Risks From Breast Radiation

Findings based on 50 cancer survivors who were followed for 25 years

MONDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A new study allays concerns that early-stage breast cancer patients who receive radiation treatment might have a long-term increased risk for heart problems.

The study included 50 stage 1 and stage 2 breast cancer patients who underwent either breast-conservation therapy using radiation (26 patients) or modified radical mastectomy (24 patients). Mastectomy is a type of surgery that involves removing the breast.

More than 25 years after treatment, both groups had similar levels of heart function and rates of heart problems. For example, the rate of heart attack within 10 years of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment was 5.1 percent for breast-conservation patients and 5.7 percent for mastectomy patients.

The study was scheduled for presentation Monday at the annual meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology in Boston.

"Over the past two decades, radiation therapy has become more precise and safer with modern techniques," lead author Dr. Charles Simone II, a radiation oncologist at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, said in a society news release.

"We are pleased to find that early-stage breast cancer patients treated with modern radiation therapy treatment planning techniques do not have an increased risk of long-term cardiac toxicity and that breast-conservation therapy with radiation should remain a standard treatment option," he added.

The data and conclusions of research presented at medical meetings are typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about breast cancer treatment.


SOURCE: American Society for Radiation Oncology, news release, Oct. 29, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Serving The Tampa Bay Area © Copyright 2014 BayCare Health System