BEACON EMR HIPAA Disclaimer Site Map Social Media
BayCare Health System
Community Benefit Financial Assistance Policy Quality Report Card Health Library News Doctor Connect Find Us
Services Hospitals Find A Doctor Classes & Events About Us Careers Contact Us Get E-Newsletter
HealthDay Articles & Information
 Back  Back


May We Help You?
 

Call 1-877-692-2922
Monday-Friday, 8am to 5pm

Persons with hearing and speech disabilities can reach the above number through TDD and other specialized equipment by calling the Florida Relay Service at 711.

Contact Us
Send 
e-mail
Search jobs


Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+) Font Size
Print    Email
Search Health Information   

Elevated Antibody Levels May Predict Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk

Danish study followed people for nearly 30 years to see who developed condition

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated blood levels of an antibody called rheumatoid factor are associated with an increased long-term risk of rheumatoid arthritis, a new study contends.

Women in their 50s and 60s who smoke appear to have the highest risk, according to the Danish researchers.

The researchers measured rheumatoid factor levels in more than 9,700 people, aged 20 to 100, who did not have rheumatoid arthritis at the start of the study. The participants were followed for up to 28 years. During that time, 183 people developed rheumatoid arthritis.

People with a rheumatoid factor level twice the normal level (less than 25 international units per milliliter) had a 3.3-fold increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. Those with the highest rheumatoid factor levels (100 IU/mL or more) had a 26-fold increased risk.

The highest 10-year risk of rheumatoid arthritis (32 percent) was found in women aged 50 to 69 who smoked and had rheumatoid factor at the highest levels. The lowest 10-year risk (0.1 percent) was found in men 70 and older with rheumatoid factor at normal levels.

The findings do not prove that rheumatoid factor is a cause of rheumatoid arthritis, but do suggest that people with a positive rheumatoid factor test should be referred to a rheumatologist for examination, the researchers said.

The study was published online Sept. 6 in the British Medical Journal.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disorder that affects about 1 percent of people worldwide, according to the American College of Rheumatology. Women are three times more likely to develop the condition than men.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about rheumatoid arthritis.


SOURCE: British Medical Journal, news release, Sept. 6, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Serving The Tampa Bay Area © Copyright 2014 BayCare Health System